About Me   

Education:

M.S. Purdue University Calumet

Ph.D. Virginia Tech

Professional Roles:

Program Director and Tenured, Associate Professor, Couple and Family Therapy Program, UNLV

Founding, board, and research committee member of the Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Association

So why would I want a solution-focused brief therapist? I often get asked this question and I love answering it. Solution-focused therapy draws upon a client’s resources to help them live their desired life despite obstacles and challenges that arise. SFBT therapists believe that it is useful to focus on one’s goals, strengths, and successes PLUS we have the research to back our effectiveness (see http://www.solutionsdoc.co.uk/sft.html for an up-to-date list of published research). Given that most people attend 10 or fewer therapy sessions, SFBT is ideal because it is tailored to work in as little as one session (Sundstron, 1993). Plus, SFBT has been used to successfully treat many types of presenting issues such as depression, substance abuse, anxiety and the list goes on and on (Kim, 2007; Smock et al., 2008). 

Updates and Press:

Evidence-Based Recognition! My clinical research has been recognized by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration as an evidence-based practice (click here to see SFGT).

Current Research on Solution-Focused Brief Therapy

Microanalysis and Induction pt 1/3 Sara Smock

Dr. Sara Smock of Texas Tech University talks about her clinical research in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. She describes the process of using inductive methods including "microanalysis" when invest...

Microanalysis and Induction Sara Smock pt 2/3

Dr. Sara Smock of Texas Tech University talks about her clinical research in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. She describes the process of using inductive methods including "microanalysis" when invest...

Microanalysis and Induction pt 3/3 Sara Smock

Dr. Sara Smock of Texas Tech University talks about her clinical research in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. She describes the process of using inductive methods including "microanalysis" when invest...

In addition, I am part of an international research group that uses microanalysis (discussed in the videos above) to study solution-focused brief therapy(http://www.microanalysis.ca/who-we-are.html)

Publications:

Book

Pichot, T. & Smock, S. A. (2009). Solution-focused substance abuse treatment. New York: Haworth.  

"Solution-Focused Substance Abuse Treatment describes the standard of care for substance abuse treatment, demonstrates how solution-focused brief therapy exceeds this standard, and shows how it can effectively be used in substance abuse evaluation, case management, and both individual and group treatment. Beginning and advanced concepts are provided to address the questions of even the most advanced clinician, all placed in the context of cultural awareness. Most importantly, the author answers the many questions professionals may have about how solution-focused brief therapy can be successfully integrated into the field of substance abuse. It provides a thorough understanding of the issues that therapists face when working with this at times challenging population, and demonstrates how the use of solution-focused brief therapy can minimize power struggles and enhance client success. Sample forms and handouts are included, as are additional resources for effective evaluation and treatment" (http://www.amazon.com/Solution-Focused-Substance-Abuse-Treatment/dp/0789037238/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1310355824&sr=8-1).

From Amazon.com

Manuals

Journal Articles

Gonzalez Suitt, K., Franklin, C., & Jordan, S. S. (2017). Solution-focused brief therapy for Chilean primary care patients: exploring a linguistic adaptation. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse.  

Turns, B., Eddy, B. P., & Jordan, S. S. (2016). Working with Siblings of Children with Autism: A Solution-Focused Approach.Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 37, 558-571.  

Jordan, S. S., & Turns, B. (2016). Utilizing Solution-Focused Brief Therapy with Families Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 27, 155-170.  

Takagi, G., Wakashima, K., Sato, K., Ikuta, M., Hanada, R, & Jordan, S. S. (2015). The Development of Solution Building Inventory Japanese Version: Validation of the SBI-J. International Journal of Brief Therapy and Family Science, 5, 19-25.  

Bavelas, J. B., De Jong, P., Jordan, S. S., & Korman, H. (2014). The theoretical and research basis of co-constructing meaning in dialogue. Journal of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, 1, 1-24.

Shumway, S.T., Dakin, J. B., Smock Jordan, S., Kimball, T.G., Harris, K. S. (2014).

The Development of the Hope and Coping in Recovery Scale (HCRS). Journal of Groups in Addiction and Recovery, 280-293.

Bavelas, J. B., Jordan, S. S., Korman, H., & De Jong, P. (May/June, 2014). Is solution-

focused brief therapy different? Family Therapy Magazine,19-23.

Jordan, S. S. (2014). Further Validation of the Solution Building Inventory. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 33, 78-88.

Richmond, C. J., Jordan, S. S., Bischof, G. H., & Sauer, E. M. (2014).

Solution-focused brief therapy intakes and intake forms. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 33, 33-47.

Bavelas, J. B., & Jordan, S. S. (2014). Introduction to SFBT Contributions to

Practice-Oriented Research. Part II: Changing the Language of Clinical Practice. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 33, 30-32.

Jordan, S. S., Froerer, A., & Bavelas, J. (2013).

Microanalysis of Positive and Negative Content in Solution-Focused Brief Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Expert Sessions. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 32, 46-59.

Froerer, A., & Jordan, S.S. (2013). Identifying Solution-Building Formulations

Through Microanalysis. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 32, 60-73.

Jordan, S. S., & Bavelas, J. B. (2013). Introduction to SFBT Contributions to

Practice-Oriented Research. Part I: Microanalysis of Communication. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 32, 13-16.

Smock, S. A., Froerer, A. S., & Blakeslee, S. E. (2011). The history of systemic

substance abuse treatment. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 22, 177-192.

Harris, K. S., Smock, S. A., & Wilkes, M. T. (2011). Relapse Resilience: A Process

Model for Recovery. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 22, 265-274.

Smock, S. A., Baker, A., Harris, K., & Dsauza, C. (2011). The role of social support

in collegiate recovery communities: A review of the literature. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 29, 35-44.

Smock, S. A.,McCollum, E., & Stevenson, M. (2010). The development of the solution-

focused inventory. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 36, 499 - 510.

Kim, J. S., Smock, S. A., Trepper, T. S., McCollum, E. E., Franklin, C. (2010). Is

solution-focused brief therapy evidence-based? Families in Society: The Journal

of Contemporary Social Sciences, 91, 300-306.

Froerer, A. S., Smock, S. A., & Seedall, R. (2009). Solution-focused group work:

Collaborating with clients diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Journal of Family Psychotherapy20, 13-27.

Smock, S. A., Trepper, T. S., Wetchler, J., McCollum, E., Ray, R., & Pierce, K. (2008).

Solution-focused group therapy for level 1 substance abusers. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 34, 107-120.

Jarrott, S. E., Gigliotti, C. M. & Smock, S. A. (2006). Using contact theory to build the

foundation of an intergenerational community between pre-school children and older adults with dementia. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 4(2), 73-92.

Smock, S. A., McWey, L. M., & Ward, D. (2006). Rural versus urban clinical needs: Are

there differences?Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 17(2), 37-49.

Smock, S. A. (2005). A student’s response to the SFBT training meetings: The future

looks bright. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 16(1/2), 11-13.

Gigliotti, C. M., Morris, M., Smock, S. A., Jarrott, S. E., & Graham, B. (2005). An

intergenerational summer program involving persons with dementia and preschool children.Educational Gerontology, 31(6), 425-441.

Nelson, T. & Smock, S.A. (2005). Challenges of an outcome-based perspective for

marriage and family therapy education. Family Process, 44(3), 355-362.

Arditti, J.A., Smock, S. A., & Parkman, T. S. (2005). “It’s been hard to be a father”: A

qualitative exploration of incarcerated fatherhood. Fathering, 3(3), 267-288.  

McCollum, E. E., Trepper, T. S., & Smock, S. A. (2004). Solution-focused brief

group therapy for drug abuse: Rationale, content, and approaches. Journal of

Family Psychotherapy, 14(4), 27-42.

Book Chapters

Turns, B., Finlayson, B., & Jordan, S. S. (in press). The Use of SFBT with Families Raising a Child with ASD. Systemically Treating ASD.

Milligan, K., Meixner, T., & Jordan, S. S. (2017). The Family with Addiction.

In S. Browning & B. van Eeden-Moorefield (Eds.), Contemporary Families at the Nexus of Research and Practice (pp.123-161). New York: Rutledge.

Jordan, S. S. (2016). Solution focused brief family therapy. In J. Carlson, & S.

Dermer (Eds.),The SAGE Encyclopedia of Marriage, Family, and Couples Counseling, 1575-1579.

Jordan, S. S. (2016). What’s better? In G. Weeks, S. Fife, & C. Peterson (Eds.),

Techniques for the Couple Therapist: Essential Interventions, 165-168.

Jordan, S. S. (2016). SFBT scaling questions with couples. In G. Weeks, S.

Fife, & C. Peterson (Eds.), Techniques for the Couple Therapist: Essential Interventions, 169-172.

DeGraff, A., Sorenson, P., Atchley, A., & Smock Jordan, S. (2014).

Physical and Mental Disabilities Co-Occurring with Substance Abuse. In R. A. Bean, S. Davis, & M. P. Davey (Eds.), Increased Self-Awareness: Experiential Exercises for Dedicated Clinicians and Supervisors, 213-218.

Luna, B., Heath, C., Smock Jordan, S., & Higgins, M. (2014).

Perceptions of LGBTA Individuals and Couples. In R. A. Bean, S. Davis, & M. P. Davey (Eds.), Increased Self-Awareness: Experiential Exercises for Dedicated Clinicians and Supervisors, 245-254.

Newman, K. E., Pettigrew, H. V., Trujillo, C. R., Smock Jordan, S. A. (2014). Social

Class, Ethnicity and Resources. In R. A. Bean, S. Davis, & M. P. Davey (Eds.), Increased Self-Awareness: Experiential Exercises for Dedicated Clinicians and Supervisors, 183-190.

Shafer, K. C., & Smock Jordan, S. A. (2013). Working with Mandated Clients with

Substance Use Disorders: A Solution-Focused Approach. In L. Ashenberg Straussner (Ed.), Clinical Work with Substance Abusing Clients (pp.202-224). New York: Guliford Press.

Smock Jordan, S. A. (2013). Solution-Focused Approach with LGBTQ Clients. In

J. Kim (Ed.), Solution Focused Brief Therapy: A Multicultural Approach (pp. 150-165). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Blakeslee, S. E., & Smock Jordan, S. A. (2013). Solution-Focused Approach with

American Indian Clients. In J. Kim (Ed.), Solution Focused Brief Therapy: A Multicultural Approach (pp. 106-121). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Smock, S. A. (2011). A review of solution-focused, standardized outcome

measures and other strengths oriented outcome measures. In C. Franklin, T. Trepper, W. Gingerich, & E. McCollum (Eds.), Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Handbook of Evidence-Based Practice (pp. 55-72). New York: Oxford University Press.

Smock, S. A. (2010). Evidence-based supervision: Identifying successful moments of

SFBT. In T. S. Nelson (Ed.),Doing Something Different: Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Practices (pp. 197-200). New York: Routledge.

Froerer, A. S., & Smock, S. A. (2010). Training therapist for SFBT group work: A

multidimensional approach. In T. S. Nelson (Ed.),Doing Something Different: Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Practices (pp. 201-208). New York: Routledge.

Smock, S. A. (2009). The evidence base of SFT. In L. Metcalf & E. Connie (Eds.), The

art of solution-focused therapy (pp. 145-154).New York: Springer Publishing.

Froerer, A. S., & Smock, S. A. (2008). The miracle blog. In C. Sori & L. Hecker (Eds.),

The Therapist’s Notebook III: More Homework, Handouts, and Activities for Use in Psychotherapy (pp.39-46).New York: Haworth.

Smock, S. A., & Thomas, F. N. (2008). Reviewing our common body of knowledge:

MFT license exam preparation manual: Fourth Edition. In B. Bradley (Ed.), Solution-focused brief therapy. Texas Association for Marriage and Family Therapy: Austin, TX.

McWey, L. M., James, E. J., & Smock, S. A. (2005). The graduate student guide to

conducting research in marriage and family therapy. In F. Piercy & D. Sprenkle (Eds.),Research methods in family therapy (pp. 19-40). Guilford Press: New York.

Smock, S. (2005). A student’s response to the SFBT training meetings: The future looks

bright.In T. S. Nelson (Ed.), Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Training (pp. 11-16). New York: Haworth.